Would you completely abandon browser's password safes?

Hi all.
I’ve just set up my bitwarden server on my Synology NAS and made it reachable via https. I’m quite happy with it and I’m looking at it as the solution to the problem I have: when I’m mobile, I don’t have access to my passwords. I have KeePass on my mobile device, but the file is actually stored on my Google Drive, which I’m happy to avoid if possible. Now it looks that it is possible, with bitwarden on my NAS.
The question here is: how do you feel about disabling all password saving mechanisms of your browsers (Edge, Firefox, Chrome, Safari are the ones I use) and sort of “migrate” over to bitwarden like I set it up (https publicly reachable)?

Before doing the great jump over to bitwarden, I wanted to read some thoughts here in the community.

Thanks and regards,
Flavio.

Hi Flavio,

if you use any password vault, I don’t think you should store them anywhere else (apart from your super secure offline backup off course). Storing them in both spaces, is a bad idea for a few reasons:

  1. It will become a hell to keep them in sync.
  2. It’s like having all your secrets stored in that really good bank vault (Bitwarden), but then also storing those same secrets in a pretty good locked cupboard (browser vault). Especially as some browsers aren’t completely open source… I would be hesitant. Your least secure storage spot is the one that will attract attacks.

The only reason I could imagine you keeping your passwords in your browser(s), is because you’re still only trying out BitWarden.

When I moved to BitWarden, I removed both the content inside all browser vaults, and turned off the autofill feature inside the browser.

2 Likes

This is indeed what I finally did - or better: I didi it right away as soon as I had Bitwarden server running on my NAS! :wink:
Thanks,
F.