Database Backup

app:desktop
app:mobile

#1

Is there a way to make a copy of the actual database (assuming an encrypted version lives locally for the time that you’re using it) and be able to make a local backup. Something other than a CSV backup since that’s unencrypted.

It would be a good way to ensure you have something to go back to in case the database becomes corrupted, such as when renewing the encryption key.

Or just for general, local backup.


#2

Agreed, I have just moved over from DashLane and used that feature alot, weekly encrypted backups.


#3

I saved a copy in an encrypted Keepass file, even though I don’t use Keepass. Bit clunky, and being able to save a copy of the encrypted database would be nice.


#4

I recall this discussion somewhere else at one point (Github?) but haven’t seen any updates.

It does seem useful to archive an encrypted copy, with its encryption or recovery key being the only things that could open it.

On previous password managers you could either export an encrypted copy, or find a local directory where it lives and simply make a compressed zip file copy from it. Plop a data on the file name and done.


#5

I would very much like this too please.

I am used to including my KeePass vault in my daily laptop cloud backup. No user interaction needed.

Also need this for Organisations.

And of course a way to restore the encrypted backup if the Bitwarden cloud vault becomes corrupt.


#6

This is a critical feature for me as well.


#7

Seems the going method is to export CSV and encrypt that (AES-256 inside a Disk Utility .dmg disk image or similar).

But then you’ve had an unencrypted version on your machine momentarily which I’m not keen of. It’s unfortunate there’s no backup feature that makes an encrypted file that can only be decrypted with that same password as the original.


#8

Unfortunately that’s a crappy workaround. :frowning_face:


#9

I never appreciated how difficult it must be to design software that can export an encrypted copy of the database, which uses the same passphrase to decrypt it. That’s how both my previous PW Manager Apps did it (Splash ID & mSecure). I’m fairly certain Enpass and others are similar.

Curious to know what prevents Bitwarden from doing the same.